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, our potential customers, so that's what our customer notification and education program is focused on. we don't want anyone being surprised by becoming our customers, we want them to understand what the service offering is that we're providing. i expect that in order to do that effectively, we will be answering people's questions that arise from receiving this mailer and then hearing from us about our program and saying, you know, how do you reconcile these two different messages and we'll have to be careful to make sure we get accurate information back to our perspective customer, not anl because we think that's the right thing to do, under the code of conduct law, we're required to do that, so we need to be careful to be giving accurate information and we know pg and e is obligate under that same code of conduct to provide accurate information and i believe the materials that you're referring to were not provided by pg and e. >> okay, by the international brotherhood of electrical workers. >> that's my understanding, by an organization funded by them. >> and you mentioned having a r
their lives forever and finishing education and get aing a job has helped individuals keeping off the block and along with that we are seek to go educate gangs so that they can continue their education and live their dreams and we call it family and education ever over everything and i'm very humble for receiving this apartward and thank you to general hospital foundation. >> (applause) . >> our second award will be presented by 98ian nay men. head of state and local relation, visa incorporated.. >> (applause) . >> good afternoon everyone god you look so great out there. i wish there was a camera up here so that you could see how wonderful you look especially with the backdrop of the ballpark. you know, i love this event for calm reasons usually it's because it's done around valentine's day and happy valentine's day by-the-way, and that is right by the day of my wedding anniversary and i'll be married 28 years torld tomorrow and pie my wife is not here today but happy anniversary sweet heart and this is beginning in 2004 and when judy good him and ellen newman and nancy vekcal come to
with the director of the early child-care and education of the human services agency and that entity deals with child-care providers from the larger, you know, professional child-care organizations for-profit, non-profit to your child-care providers that work inside their homes. so the primary focus was talking about how could we work together? what way can we work together to assist the smaller child-care providers in running and operating their business? you know, maintaining -- because they are just individuals who do this for love and they don't necessarily think about the business organization. so we have just started having a conversation and a dialogue and i don't know exactly what is going to transpire from here, but just to have the information. we shared with michelle the information that we provide at the assistance center, when an individual or individuals come in, who want to do child-care especially child-care in their home. what are the rules? what are the regs? and also, more importantly, what sort of support is out there? hsa does have some financing programs and som
. that's why i'm investing in education. personally, and with all of my administration, i personally adopted the 12 middle schools in this city to make sure that the truancy goes down, is not eliminated, that the kids who are in our middle schools have the hope, the hope that we're generating when they were in elementary school, involved with their parents, have the same kind of guidance and support as they get to critical decisionses about whether or not they see the vision of living in the city and going to college and getting the kind of education and skill sets to take on these great jobs that we're creating. i want to make sure -- yes. (applause) >> i want to make sure that our tech sf are training programs rhonda is heading up and so many others create the foundation at the skill sets to earn these new jobs. it's ecology jobs that we all see happening that pay very good salaries, that we're training people in bayview, in the western addition, in all of our city to make sure they have not only the good shots that they get those jobs as well. and that's why it's so important that
. in that effort both in advocacy we have a strong, strong goal of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and wo
and the california public utilities commission, the status of our customer notification and education plan and an update on our legislation related to clean energy and ms. radica fox will provide the legislative update for you, with respect to the first item, the sfpuc activities, we are progressing as planned, we are on time as our time schedule, we have rated options possible at our commission on march 12th, at that time, we'll be presenting our commission with a customer poll results, we'll be presenting the not to exceed rate for adoption and possible adoption, consideration and possible adoption and that will be accompanied with a report from the rate fairness board providing the commission with advice on those not to exceed rates. at the california puc, we are actively engage on that setting on the proceeding that they are conducting on pg and e's proposed green tariff omtion, they proposed a 100% green power product. that product is proposed to use green e energy certificates, it's anticipated to enroll 30 thousand residential accounts, which is about .68% of eligible customers, and
on our department of education website? greg has details next. ♪ ♪ hey. they're coming. yeah. british. later. sorry. ok...four words... scarecrow in the wind... a baboon... monkey? hot stew saturday!? ronny: hey jimmy, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? jimmy: happier than paul revere with a cell phone. ronny: why not? anncr: get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved. emerson. ♪ at a hertz expressrent kiosk, you can rent a car without a reservation... and without a line. now that's a fast car. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. >>> washington, the pig story here is the vie produce bail-out. they are safe from bankruptcy, but at what cost? those with bank accounts will looking for government seizures above 40%. it's called bail-in. a leade
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
everyday with programs specifically designed to increase wellness. health education in their lives these important life enhancing services are available for all residents of san francisco regardless of able to pay. and on top of that remarkable approach to service the hospital's quality care is the best in the bay area. last year the general won the patient safety first zero hero award as well as the california association of public hospital's safety net institute quality leaders top honest a bard ask that is why it's important to support the general hospital foundation and support programs at the hospital in the following video, stephanie tom matt see and crew beatifully cap toured two of those programs and their benefits: . >> i have eniwent to a friend who was building our new home and i went to step on an attached floor and it wasn't and i fell onto concrete. when character shier came to san francisco general hospital it was clear she had very significant injuries which includeddier to her pelvis and her heel bone. san francisco general is the only trauma center in the
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
education and with legislative and regulatory agency. we provide formal and informal advice to the city of san francisco and in support of this implementation program, they set up a process where sea members. in this regard we have established a working group to participate in the implementation development of the soft frame retrofit ordinance. this working group of structural engineers have met to discuss the aspects of the ordinance. as part of this discussion the group has developed and endorses the following statements of support for the ordinance. supports the city of county of san francisco's effort to reduce risk through a comprehensive program such as thatten visioned by the safety implementation program and -- can be effective towards risk reduction goals and we'll continue to develop technical criteria appropriate for the ordinances purpose and intent. we will also continue to support the city's implementation of the ordinance through education and guidance of engineers and other stake holders. we look forward to continue our relationship with the county and city of san franc
agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of
to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which to
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were more than hap
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were
to acknowledge that and bring that into the conversation. and we also try to give back by creating educational and networking eventsed. before i go on, i just wanted to share a few comments. as we began our planning for 2013, we solicited from our email list, some comments both on the attendees' past experience and how it's impacted their business? and kind of the things that they would like to see? a few of those comments when we asked if you attended san francisco small business week in 2012, did your business benefit from attending and if so, how? yes, excellent training, great networking opportunities. great ideas, great information. yes, i attended absolutely my business was improved. i met incredible vendors, mentor and resources to tap as i go, clear, precise and helpful and timely information regarding the business of doing business. and increased self-confidence as i realized i knew more than i gave myself credit for as an entrepreneur. and my favorite one is, "yes, i was not aware there were so many organizations that would help people to start a business." so we feel really good
are learning a lot. some will get jobs because of your education, but many of you will pay 200,000 dollars and get little more than debt. the reason dale stevens founded the web site uncollege.org. how to get ahead without college. in the book half of your education is sub titled ditch the lectures save ten's of college and learn more than your peers ever will. what do you mean learn more than your peers. there's a reason they go to college. >> they go to college because you are told to. society says this is what you need to do in order to be successful in your life. you have to learn exactly what they tell you not necessarily the things that you want to learn or interest you. >> i just wanted to learn comic books and about girls, i wouldn't have learned anything if i didn't have a college directing me. >> maybe you would have started a comic book about girls. >> people go to your web site and tell you you helped me drop out and i am doing better? >> we have a community of 10,000 people around the world who are doing creative things with your education instead of going to school. there's p
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
the public education system based on the progressive theories of john dewey. the compatriots' railed against the memorization and that children should read and write and do sums on their own timetable and that was even harmful to force them to do it faster. she believed their emotional development was as important as their intellectual development and she said that most important thing that a school could do is get children into the habit of being happy. most importantly, she believed come and her fellow progressive educators believed that a school must instill in children's minds the ability to think independently so that they could participate fully in the american democracy. in 1932, he elizabeth irwin's class's or at p.s. 41 which most of you probably know is on west 11th street, and it still is in the village. the city at that point withdrew its funding from the experiment and the parents were so upset that their children wouldn't be able to take class with elizabeth warren that they banded together and something that's famous at a parent's ice cream parlor they got together the money o
for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tpo-rpbs/] that we reinforce to our representatives. those who did need capital 2:1 and those who couldn't get capital versus those who can't get capital. so it's clearly a problem for those who need i
of phoenix and other for-profit educational institutions, reported a 79% drop due to lower enrollment. the stock was the biggest gainer in the s&p today, up more than 7%. coming up, we'll look at why some college graduates are having trouble with education debt and what some schools are doing about it. >> and alsoñuf still ahead, the supreme court hears a case that touches the wallet and the medicine cabinets of moat americans. first take a look at how the international markets finished the day. >>> some good news about prices at the pump. average gasoline prices fell a little more than 3 cents a gallon to $3.71 nationwide. the city with the highest average price in the lower 48 states? see if you can guess. chicago, $4.10. lowest average price just $3.33 a gallon is in montana. >> just days after the senate passed its first budget in four years, bill dudley, president of the federal reserve bank in new york, told -- >> this may not immediately lead to stronger growth because of the recent increase in fiscal restraint. >> also washington today, the supreme court hearing arguments in
of the and he calls it inform the see that education, he is not alone in this they're saying the same thing that we suspend our efforts teaching people how to find stuff for information on the internet it is different from knowing things. the fight took all the electricity away we have a blackout i said if your devices don't work what do you know, ? they will say not much because i need to be able to find things it is published last year that if you ask people to do a google search than later ask them what they found, there better remembering how they followed the search path they're remembering the contents. so these technologies, plus kugel maybe i could live without it but it is redefining what it means to no. not just because of technology but people in education say we should learn how to use these. we are raising a generation of people to believe it is not what you know, or how you analyze the argument or who you are but that worries me incredibly. >> host: what is your view on the pbs? >> guest: some faculty members say over my dead body to use wikipedia it is a fascinating experime
political group focusing on issues important to the tech community like immigration and education reform, zuckerberg reportedly ready to spend $20 million on the venture including a bipartisan group of consultants. at the rosewood hotel in menlo park, back to you. >> emily, thank you so much. >> feel like having chocolate? >> you've known me for years. i always do. >> in belguim all have you to do is send a letter. >> the country released stamp that's smell, look and smell like chocolates. >> perfumed stamps have been made in the past. this is the first time they're able to taste the flavor when licking the back of the stamps. there is an idea. that is what they need. >> it's a good idea. >> that is the best chocolate in the world. no rain and cool for spring but it's feeling good out there. here is a a look out there. we've got temperatures down a little bit but no rain threatening us in the forecast future. just north we have a wide area of scattered moisture. you can see that maybe you can't see this, but much of this is not hitting the ground. there is a slight chance of showers thur
. and partly because having grown up in new york city as i will tell you with a very inadequate education he was not capable of writing a thank you note. so if his wife was unable to do for him and she would almost everything, if she couldn't do for him he didn't do it because his spelling was phonetic german accent spelling. his handwriting can only be described as horrible. so people often want to know how i came to write about thomas nast and it's a story that originated in gretchen school in california, where i was contributing material for an encyclopedia and produced by my visor, and i chose his name off of a list thinking it would be entertaining. and then my what to look for me to about him i couldn't find any and i thought i'm the world's worst graduate student and they should take me out. i called by pfizer and said i don't know what i'm doing. she said let me look. she looked and she said it's fine, it's not you. there is nothing about him. so it turns out that what existed at that time was a biography published in 1904 by albert bigelow paine who is a newspaper writer for childre
. sons,cided that her four and the youngest, would be better served by a per educational methods than by various public schools -- would be better served by her educational methods. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in rk.viding that sparked -- spa i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. do you think that is derived from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at bats, and we would go to the dictionary and looking it up -- and i got pretty good at that. and we would go to the d
to focus on education in inner-city is and in fact that's what many of them did in the leader parts of their lives. so, we need to call young people back to service and this sort of great young talent getting out of politics and in doing great work in these other sectors back into the political process to get >> host: how do we do that? how does the political class and the current apparatus attract more young people? is it irrepressible? >> guest: the people going into politics a lot of them are coming through the same sort of career approach rising up through the ranks of running for city council and wanting to -- a young career politician is no better than an old career politician. there needs to be a generational commitment to do this. if you have a group of people to do this than you could make an impact. it's not to be someone like a jim webb who came to congress could make an impact and then sort of checked out and said there isn't a role for one person if you don't have a group or coalition of people coming together to solve problems and that is what this generation needs. as
're given opportunities to fully participate and take advantage of higher education opportunities and that's what the issue is here. this is distinct from fisher vs. the university of texas. >> neil: the argument could be in michigan they said we addressed this grieve vances in inequalities and it's not an issue anymore. >> that's exactly right sandra day o'connor, the last case that was herd, she said in 25 years this may not be necessary, but in the states that have passed these laws, michigan being one of eight -- have decided it's not necessary anymore. the laws giving previous rep shall treatment based on race, ethnicity is not necessary. >> is that the state usurping the federal government? >> that's the argue. >> in california the appeals court has upheld this, which is another reason why the supreme court is going to hear it. you have two pel las courts with different decisions. >> you look at the history. seems as if this is -- was an inorganic movement. you had one of the architects, a big supporter of the california proposition that heather is referring to, who came on out and s
are not cheap. steve, the directer of the narc institute for early education research at rutgers was consulted by the white house. there's a number, estimated, one the president's plan, that early childhood education could cost up to $10 billion a year, rick. this goes in the line of more spending, more recovery. this is a lot of money. >> well, yeah, but here's the concern. i don't know how you can make the argument that 800,000 civilian defense workers losing their jobs can be good for the economy. i don't quite see how that's possible, and now on spending on preschool, look, what we're looking at now, forget the president's agenda to increase it. we're now looking at a major cut to head start because of the sequester. i don't know if that impacts on the economy today, but you can't tell me this is a good thing for the future when we take away the programs for kids. >> bottom line is, literally, barack obama needs more revenue. he needs another source. he just raised taxes on the risk, talking about closing deductions which is not enough. i'd like to predict they will eventually put another
, and the youngest, would be -- i'm the youngest and would be better served by her educational methods than by various public schools. the family traveled around between north carolina, long island, and virginia. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in providing that spark. it's what you really want to see education represent. i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> it was totally unpredictable. there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at that, and we would go to the unabridged dict
to urge them to tell the public -- our job is to educate. it's the public's job to decide when they look on the grocery shelf or have the lever on a soda machine which thing to take, which product is in their interest. all we're trying to do is educate and then hopefully if they understand they would be better off with one product or another, they'll make the intelligent choice. >> you could do ads for education as the executive of new york city, you are telling people what they can and cannot do. why is that government's job to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we shoul
, education, health care, and the more that they can be seen as a part that's inclusive, better shot they have at this growing population. you mention this idea of naturalization ceremony. richard, i became naturalized when i was nine years old. i still remember that moment in san francisco city hall, raising my right hand with my mother. it was so emotional, impactful and exciting, i can only imagine how folks feel being in front of the president helping administer the oath. >> it is such an experience to be there. >> it is beautiful. >> we are going there shortly when the president speaks which we expect to happen in about two minutes. one comment that has been made about the debate that's been on the hill about immigration reform when you look at high skill versus low skill, the high tech visa piece, this could hurt women more than men. talk about that when you look at the low skill issue in terms of bringing in new immigrants to the united states. >> not just for high skilled labor but low skilled labor, the majority of individuals that cross the border undocumented or overstay the visa ha
was offered social housing and now determined to improve the situation from the education. he will lose fourteen pounds in the tax and three pounds in council tax leaving 11 pounds per week after utility. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship what advice does he have for jordan? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady, first of all, the government is investing in social housing. she'll hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point, when housing benefit costs 23 billion pounds a year, we have to reform it. there's a basic issue of fairness which is why should someone who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a spare room subsidize when someone in social housing should? there's a basic issue of fairness. that's why it should be put right. >> i might be honorable member for -- i'm very proud of our coalition for sticking to -- [inaudible] >> the honorable lay by's question -- lady's question must be heard. >> we set an example for the world and later on this month the prime minister goes to bali to co-chair the high level panel to discuss
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
and is now studying for a levels. he is determined to improve his situation through education. from his 56 pound weekly benefits you will lose 14 pounds in the bedroom tax and three pounds in council tax. leaving just 11 pounds per week to live on after utilities. based on the prime minister's experience of hardship, what is does he have? >> the point i would make to the honorable lady is that first this government is investing in social housing and she will hear more about that in a moment or two. the second point i would make is that when housing benefit cost 23 billion pounds a year we simply have to reform it. ofre is a basic issue fairness, which is, why should somebody who is living in private rented accommodation not receive a fair room subsidy when somebody who is in social housing showed? there is a basic issue of fairness. that is why it should be put right. >> unlike the honorable member paul shipley, i am very proud of our coalition for sticking to the 0.7% target. [shouting] >> the honorable ladies question must be heard. people should not year before they ar heard. >> later o
and i sent them to the uk for the quality of education there for a better future and maybe the chance to work. how is this criminal? to have dreams for my children and family and working hard every day. >> now in the meantime, the banks are still closed and there are reports that the two sick banks which should have been able to re-open tomorrow because the emp cb said they would provide liquidity says that they may not open until at least thursday. that would be 12 days with the major banks closed. people are going to the super markets. there may be a food shortage. why was this woman buying so much? she was from russia and she has seen this movie before and she fears shortages. >> you're originally from russia? >> yes, exactly. i have lived through this. uncertainties and yes, i'm worried. >> is that why you think you're doing this today? because you have seen this before? >> yes. i have seen how it develops and how quickly and badly it can develop. >> so the president of this country is supposed to appear any moment. he's usually late and might be worse because there is a meeting t
? we've solved a problem in our society, how to educate the next generation. and let me tell you, this is an important matter. we economists believe that the single most important factor shaping the future of any economy in the world including the united states is the quality and the quantity of the educated trained labor force it produces. college and universities are where we do that. if we're crippling an entire generation with debts they cannot support and jobs that will not encourage them to continue in their studies we are as a nation shooting ourselves in the foot going forward. it's a demonstration of the dysfunctionality of our system. and then the question comes could we forgive the students' debts? well, it's an interesting idea. but how then do you go to the people who can't afford their credit card debts or their home debts or their mortgage debts -- they're all hurting. and the students have a special claim, i give them that. and we need those students, i understand it. but we have to go at the root of a society which allows unspeakable wealth to accumulate in the h
if those people were young today they wouldn't do that. they would focus on education in inner cities and that's what many of them did in the later parts of their lives. so, we need to call young people book to service. we need to call the sort of brain drain of all these great young talent going out of politics and into doing great work in other sectors, back into the political process. >> host: how does the political class and the current apparatus attract more young people? is it irreparable. >> guest: it's very difficult because young people going into politics, a lot of them are coming through the same sort of career approach, rising up through the ranks of running for city council and then wanting to run -- and a young career politician is no better than an old career politician. someone who has amibition in the future. we need people with a sense of service and commitment back in politics. there needs to be a generational commitment to do this, and that's -- this generation needs to realize the importance. if you have a group of people together to do this, then you could make a
' attitudes about same-sex marriage. >> i think will & grace probably did more to educate the american public than anything anybody's done so far. >> on this, supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage agree, hollywood has been influential of encouraging acceptance of gays and lesbians. it was through the medium of television that millions of americans first had open gays and lesbians in their living rooms. >> i can accept the fact that he's gay, but why does he have to slip a ring on this guy's finger? it was even fodder for the "golden girls". >> everyone wants someone to grow old with. shouldn't everyone have that chance? >> i'm judd. >> in 1994, pedro on the real world san francisco introduced a gay man with hiv/aids to millions of then-teenagers. he died that year and was praised by president clinton. ♪ so no one told you life was gonna be this way ♪ >> it helped to create an environment of acceptance where more and more gays and lesbians came out of the closet. the six friends may have all been straight, but more and more americans have friends that are not. and that's what's cha
: a big part is education; right? education of using the card in an appropriate fashion. why is that also a key -- a key promise of what you are doing? >> well, we're at an nnovaton conference, so many innovations and payments in the marketplace. what's challenging is getting consumers to understand the features and benefits getting them to adopt them. that's what pay perks is here for, educate consumers about what products and features are available for them and get them to use them in ways that benefit, again, the value chain. shibani: dozens of companies here, but few run by a female. talk to me about being a woman in this environment, in this lean in time that cheryl sandberg talked about, and, you know, just overall what your views are. >> it's not something i think about a lot. with sheryl out now, it is interesting to think about. i think that there's no difference between male and female ceos, and i think it's nice to get attention from a female ceo, but i would rather be recognized as a ceo. shibi: it was on this day in business back in 1894 that the very first stanley cup champi
, spearheading nutrition education, keeping kids active. >> when we come together, we make so much progress than just one person trying to do it alone. >> reporter: winning by losing in unison. ron mott, nbc news, oklahoma city. >>> that's "nbc nightly news" for this sunday. brian williams will be here tomorrow. i'm lester holt. i hope you'll join me shortly for "dateline." in the meantime, for all of us for "dateline." in the meantime, for all of us here at nbc news, goodnight. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> nbc bay area news starts now. >>> good evening. >> we're following developing news tonight where a man may have been swept out to sea. we're told the 22-year-old was playing football with friends at roosevelt beach. friends told the coast guard he disappeared after trying to catch a ball in the water. several county agencies are involved in the search right now and the coast guard has called in a helicopter as well. we're headed to the bay right now and we'll bring you the latest on the search as soon as we learn it. >> this afternoon, a father driving with his fall lid emilyp ge
to walk to and from school with my friends. i'm so proud to be a product of the public education and the san francisco unified school drink district. as you can see i have a hard time separating my personal life from my professional life. i look forward to continue to work and make sure that our residents have parks and playground to enjoy. making sure that our representative are well represented when it comes to budget discussions and making sure that we have a thriving local economy. people choose to live in the outer sunset for a certain quality of life and i hope that i can contribute my part to ensure that people if you're a college student, i want to make people love to live in san francisco. i would like to thank someone who has been a huge part of my life. carmen chu. to me carmen has really set a great example of what a supervisor should be. someone who should maintain integrity and someone who represents issues in a great manner and even if someone you are in disagreement with, treats you with respect. as john said, follows hilary clinton, i have big heels to fill. th
bracketology. the national endowment for financial education is stealing a page from the n.c.a.a. to help americans score with their money. paul golden of nefe joins us via skype this morning. good morning to you. > > good morning, good to be with you. > how well do americans do with their brackets? > > this is a great thing with the financial 4s, there are no upsets in this, and there are not going to be any wrong answers. what the financial 4 provides is basically a way to kind of look at how you prioritize your financial goals. what we have done is we have come up with 32 financial concepts that people need to be thinking about and mindful about when it comes to their finances, and they run them through the bracket, and they come up with their financial 4, which should be the top things that they should be focused on this year. > give us some of those topics that you are running through. i want to talk about all 32, but just give us a few. > > sure. it is everything from living within your means to having mindful communication with your family members about finances, managing food cost
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
% of the businesss did not know that the tax credit was there. there really is an education that needs to go on. a lot of people will argue that 50,000 average per employee is so low that a lot of businesses aren't going to qualify. i might also point out that currently for the current year as tangerine said in 2013 it will be 50%, but currently the credit that is available and has been available for a few years is 35%. so that is the current credit. and i think one of the things that you have until -- anybody knows if it's march 15 to file for that? >> yes. >> march 15th, you need to file for it for the year. the other thing is, as was mentioned, how is an individual going to comply? and it's going to be through the taxes that they pay. but i thought you might find it interesting to find out -- now this is for businesss with 50 or more employees. what does the need to do? what the business need to do is provide the name, address, tax information and whether it offers full-time or part-time employees. the monthly premium of the lowest cost option, the employer's share of the cost cover
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